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World’s Largest Truck Convoy

The Truck Convoy® is a unique one-day celebration of the trucking industry and its support of Special Olympics. Local law enforcement makes special dispensation and escort a convoy of trucks up to 50 miles through their town.

A man sitting in a truck with his thumb up

To find a World’s Largest Truck Convoy® in your local area, please see the details below.

The Truck Convoy®

Truckers meet at a staging location and are escorted in convoy to a predetermined destination, such as a raceway, fairgrounds or truck stop, where they are welcomed by the Special Olympics community - athletes, families, friends, colleagues, law enforcement officers, and the organizations, companies and agencies that make up the trucking industry. A celebration - a picnic, barbecue, awards ceremony, etc. is held to recognize participating truckers and the support of the trucking industry. Whatever form the celebration takes, the message is the same: "Thank you for your support of Special Olympics athletes and for keeping our communities moving!"

Inspired by the powerful impact Special Olympics had on his life through his participation in the Law Enforcement Torch Run®, combined with his family's involvement with the trucking industry, Norm Schneiderhan, a Corporal with the Orange County Sheriff's Department, created the Truck Convoy, a one-day celebration of the trucking industry to help raise awareness and funds for Special Olympics.

The 2017 Truck Convoy will take place in various locations during Trucker Appreciation Week (September 10-16, 2017) and the full month of September. Please find below the Truck Convoy dates by location and attached event details. For more information, please contact the individual listed for your state or province below, or Victoria Rivers, Manager, LETR/Corporate Development, Special Olympics, +1 202 824-0341 or vrivers@specialolympics.org


World's Largest Truck Convoy Registration

Truck Convoy News and Stories


June 15, 2017 | North America: Southern California

3 routes, 900 miles, Transforming Lives

By Richard Fernandez

LETR Final Leg Runners Southern California

The Police Department from California State University Channel Islands in Camarillo took part in the Special Olympics Southern California LETR Final Leg on June 8. They were one of more than 200 agencies that took part in the annual run leading up to the Summer Games.View Story The Police Department from California State University Channel Islands in Camarillo took part in the Special Olympics Southern California LETR Final Leg on June 8. They were one of more than 200 agencies that took part in the annual run leading up to the Summer Games. The CIPD and their officers were among more than 3,000 law enforcement officers that ran the Flame of Hope nearly 900 miles in Southern California. The Southern California Torch Run is made up of three routes that travel through more than 150 communities stretching from San Luis Obispo and Bakersfield all the way to San Diego. The CIPD ran in the Northern Route that took place in the counties of San Luis Obispo, Ventura, Santa Barbara and northern Los Angeles. The Final Leg ended with San Luis Obispo Police Department Lieutenant Bill Proll running the Flame of Hope with athlete Shawn Regan in the Opening Ceremony on Saturday, June 10.

About Richard Fernandez:Richard Fernandez is the AVP, Development for LETR in Southern California.
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June 05, 2017 | Africa: Kenya

Law Enforcement Torch Run in the Africa Region

By Joe Mutua

Charles Nyambe, President of the Special Olympics Africa Region, and Scott Whyte, Chairperson of the Law Enforcement Torch Run.

Scott Whyte, Chairperson of the Law Enforcement Torch Run, came to the Africa Leadership Conference from Australia.View Story Scott Whyte, Chairperson of the Law Enforcement Torch Run (LETR) resident in Australia, attended the Africa Leadership Conference to discuss LETR future strategy and growth in the Africa Region. The mission of the Law Enforcement Torch Run® is to raise awareness and funds for Special Olympics. Historically, LETR is the movement's largest Special Olympics public fundraiser and vehicle for creating Special Olympics awareness.Known as Guardians of the Flame, law enforcement members and Special Olympics athletes carry the “Flame of Hope” into Opening Ceremonies of local competitions. They also carry it into Special Olympics State, Provincial, National, Regional and World Games. There are over 97,000 Law Enforcement members that carry the torch annually. The flame symbolizes courage and celebration of diversity uniting communities around the globe.

About Joe Mutua:I am the Program Development Manager for Special Olympics Africa. 
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May 18, 2017 | North America: Alaska

Flame of Hope Travels Across Alaska, Features Special Olympics Facility

By Jimmy Johnson

The March 2017 publication of "Exceptional Parent” Magazine features the Special Olympics Alaska Sports, Heath and Wellness Center.

On May 20, 14 communities throughout the great state of Alaska participated as the Flame of Hope was carried through towns and cities from the temperate rain forests and coast of the southeast, to the frozen tundra of the north, and every place in between. Alaska's LETR Executive Council is thrilView Story On May 20, 14 communities throughout the great state of Alaska participated as the Flame of Hope was carried through towns and cities from the temperate rain forests and coast of the southeast, to the frozen tundra of the north, and every place in between. Alaska's LETR Executive Council is thrilled to announce that starting this year, in Anchorage, the Law Enforcement Torch Run and Pledge Drive will showcase the incredible Special Olympics Alaska Sports, Health and Wellness Center as the starting and finish point for that city's 5K run and BBQ, Unified Sports and family activities on May 20. The center is a dream come true for Special Olympics Alaska, a beautiful $8 million facility boasting 28,000 square feet of Olympic style training and managing space. The center opened in 2014, and now houses a multitude of programs designed to better the lives of those with intellectual disabilities and serves as a beacon for the message of inclusion and acceptance.

About Jimmy Johnson:I am a proud member of the Law Enforcement Torch Run family in Alaska.
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May 17, 2017 | North America: Illinois

Illinois Law Enforcement Torch Run State Committee Adds Athlete to Member Roster

By Alexandra McMillin

Rikki Kirsch, Athlete Liaison for the LETR State Committee in Illinois, poses with Illinois Torch Run Director, Steve Stelter.

For the first time, the Illinois Law Enforcement Torch Run has added an Athlete Liaison to the State Committee. Special Olympics Illinois athlete Rikki Kirsch proudly joins the group. She has competed in Special Olympics for many years in several sports ranging from equestrian to golf. Rikki attView Story For the first time, the Illinois Law Enforcement Torch Run has added an Athlete Liaison to the State Committee. Special Olympics Illinois athlete Rikki Kirsch proudly joins the group. She has competed in Special Olympics for many years in several sports ranging from equestrian to golf. Rikki attended the 2014 Special Olympics USA Summer Games in New Jersey where she represented Illinois in aquatics. This year marked her first time competing in the State Winter Games and she took home gold in snowshoeing. Since becoming Global Messenger, Rikki officially met all the qualifications to become an athlete liaison. “Having Rikki involved with the Torch Run committee is one of the reasons Illinois has such a successful program and is respected worldwide,” says Torch Run Director and Chief of the Westchester Police Department, Steve Stelter. The Athlete Liaison is a Special Olympics Athlete whose primary responsibility is represent the interests of all Special Olympics Illinois athletes.

About Alexandra McMillin:Assistant Director of Communications and Media Relations, Special Olympics Illinois
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May 17, 2017 | North America: Southern California

Honoring the Fallen and Those That Protect and Serve

By Roberta Abner, Los Angeles County Sheriff

Officers stand watch at the memorial in Washington DC honoring those who gave their lives in service.

During 2016, 135 law enforcement officers in the United States did not make it home to their families at the end of their shift. This is the highest number of fatalities on the job in five years. Nearly half of these were fatally shot, including 21 police officers who died in different ambush-stylView Story National Police Officer Memorial Week was held in Washington D.C. and across the United States May 14-20, recognizing officers killed while on duty. During 2016, 135 law enforcement officers in the United States did not make it home to their families at the end of their shift. This is the highest number of fatalities on the job in five years. Nearly half of these were fatally shot, including 21 police officers who died in different ambush-style attacks carried out across the country. It was indeed a sad year for law enforcement. In 1962, U.S. President John F. Kennedy signed the bill into law declaring May 15th Peace Officer's Memorial Day, and the week as Police Memorial Week. During this week, we pay tribute to those officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice. Some of the fallen officers, including our international brothers and sisters, were part of our Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics movement and will also be recognized at the next International Torch Run Conference in Nashville. We honor those who lost their lives while serving others. They will never be forgotten.

About Roberta Abner, Los Angeles County Sheriff:LASD Reserve Deputy and Retired Division Chief
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