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World’s Largest Truck Convoy

The Truck Convoy® is a unique one-day celebration of the trucking industry and its support of Special Olympics. Local law enforcement makes special dispensation and escort a convoy of trucks up to 50 miles through their town.

A man sitting in a truck with his thumb up

To find a World’s Largest Truck Convoy® in your local area, please see the details below.

The Truck Convoy®

Truckers meet at a staging location and are escorted in convoy to a predetermined destination, such as a raceway, fairgrounds or truck stop, where they are welcomed by the Special Olympics community - athletes, families, friends, colleagues, law enforcement officers, and the organizations, companies and agencies that make up the trucking industry. A celebration - a picnic, barbecue, awards ceremony, etc. is held to recognize participating truckers and the support of the trucking industry. Whatever form the celebration takes, the message is the same: "Thank you for your support of Special Olympics athletes and for keeping our communities moving!"

Inspired by the powerful impact Special Olympics had on his life through his participation in the Law Enforcement Torch Run®, combined with his family's involvement with the trucking industry, Norm Schneiderhan, a Corporal with the Orange County Sheriff's Department, created the Truck Convoy, a one-day celebration of the trucking industry to help raise awareness and funds for Special Olympics.

The 2017 Truck Convoy will take place in various locations during Trucker Appreciation Week (September 10-16, 2017) and the full month of September. Please find below the Truck Convoy dates by location and attached event details. For more information, please contact the individual listed for your state or province below, or Victoria Rivers, Manager, LETR/Corporate Development, Special Olympics, +1 202 824-0341 or vrivers@specialolympics.org


World's Largest Truck Convoy Registration

Truck Convoy News and Stories


October 11, 2017 | Asia Pacific: Australia

The Chairman's Corner - October 2018

By Scott Whyte

Another successful LETR International Conference has come and gone. Thanks to the hard work by SO Tennessee, LETR Tennessee and the International Conference Planning Committee, the conference was an amazing success. 1200 attendees (the largest ever) came together to listen, learn and share aboutView Story Another successful LETR International Conference has come and gone.Thanks to the hard work by SO Tennessee, LETR Tennessee and the International Conference Planning Committee, the conference was an amazing success. 1200 attendees (the largest ever) came together to listen, learn and share about ways to improve the lives of our athletes. We recognised the efforts of high achieving individuals and programs with four inductees to the LETR Richard LaMunyon Hall of Fame (Ward Webb, Francis Williams, Robert Woolsey and the first ever Honorary award to retired Chief Joe Casey from Tennessee); three John Carion Unsung Hero Award winners (Eric Abt, Rex Caldwell and Elwood Johnson) and two outstanding recipients of the Council Athlete Award (Kevin Brown and Fred Siegel).We celebrated another record year - raising $56,641,000 in 2016. This would would not be possible without the dedication of our law enforcement volunteers.Looking forward to Las Vegas in 2018.

About Scott Whyte:Scott Whyte is the Chairman of the LETR International Executive Council.
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September 20, 2017 | North America: Michigan

SOMI athlete runs Mackinac Bridge with LETR members

By Aaron Mills

From Left to Right: Officer Jeremy Walleman of the Sterling Heights Police Department, Special Olympics Michigan athlete Julian Borst of Kalamazoo, Sergeant Mark Bunting of the Bellamy Creek Correctional Facility in Ionia and Trooper Jim Yeager of the Michigan State Police (Lakeview Post)

Law Enforcement members spent the week of September 11 running across the state as part of a 750-mile relay known as "Central Route", raising money and awareness for the athletes of Special Olympics Michigan. On Wednesday, September 13, one of those athletes, 20-year-old Julian Borst from KalamazooView Story Law Enforcement members spent the week of September 11 running across the state as part of a 750-mile relay known as "Central Route", raising money and awareness for the athletes of Special Olympics Michigan. On Wednesday, September 13, one of those athletes, 20-year-old Julian Borst from Kalamazoo joined Officer Jeremy Walleman of the Sterling Heights Police Department, Trooper Jim Yeager of the Michigan State Police (Lakeview Post), and Sergeant Mark Bunting of the Bellamy Creek Correctional Facility in Ionia in taking the relay across the Mackinac Bridge from St. Ignace to the lower peninsula. The relay ended on Belle Isle near Detroit on Friday, September 15. Borst is an avid runner, training five to 11 miles per day. He's also one of 56 Special Olympics athletes who will represent Michigan at the 2018 Special Olympics USA Games in Seattle next July.

About Aaron Mills:Aaron Mills is the Sr. Marketing and Communications Director for Special Olympics Michigan.
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August 30, 2017 | North America: Canada

Corrections officers ‘jailed’ for Special Olympics Saskatchewan

By Chelsea Fidler

Free Our Finest 2017 - Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

Two of our finest corrections officers volunteered to be jailed up on a scaffolding for the first ever Free Our Finest fundraising event in Saskatchewan.View Story From Aug 18-20, two of our finest corrections officers volunteered their time to be "jailed" up on a scaffolding for the first ever Free Our Finest fundraising event in support of Special Olympics Saskatchewan. Desiree Hesson with Saskatchewan Correctional Centre and Wade Madland with Corrections Canada ascended up the scaffolding at 10:00 AM on Friday and weren’t permitted to descend until Sunday at 2:00 PM or until the event reached its fundraising goal of $20,000. Multiple law enforcement agencies came together for this fundraiser, from Saskatoon Police Service, RCMP, Corrections Canada, Provincial Corrections, Ministry of Environment, and Provincial Sheriffs. With the help of Special Olympics athletes and volunteers, funds were raised through merchandise sales, a BBQ, donations, and selling full water guns that were used to spray down the officers up on the scaffold. This first-time event was a huge success, finishing the weekend with a total of $23,550!

About Chelsea Fidler:Director of Marketing and Development & LETR Liaison for Special Olympics Saskatchewan
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August 30, 2017 | North America: Oregon

Oregon Officer Receives Ken Davis Unsung Hero Award

By Jenelle Clinton

Ken Davis Award; Oregon Summer State Games

Officer Jan Childers is an enthusiastic supporter of Law Enforcement Torch Run and Special Olympics Oregon.View Story Officer Jan Childers is an enthusiastic supporter of Law Enforcement Torch Run and Special Olympics Oregon. For the past six years, she has been the team captain of her Port of Portland Polar Plunge Team. Officer Childers has also participated in Tip a Cop, dodge ball tournaments, sold raffle tickets, and has presented innumerable medals. What is particularly impressive about Officer Childers' involvement in LETR, is her drive to share her enthusiasm and love for the program with other officers. Her passion for LETR is truly contagious, and has increased volunteerism and camaraderie among Oregon Law Enforcement.Officer Childers has shared with fellow law enforcement that she volunteers with LETR because she is motivated by the accomplishments of Special Olympics' athletes. In seeing Officer Childers at medal presentations, giving hugs to athletes and grinning from ear to ear, it is readily apparent that Officer Childers is an exemplary Guardian of the Flame.

About Jenelle Clinton:Jenelle Clinton has been the LETR Liaison for Special Olympics Oregon since November 2016. As the wife of a police officer she considers it an honor to be a part of building the bond between Oregon Law Enforcement and the inspiring athletes of Special Olympics.
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August 11, 2017 | North America: Northern California

First-Ever Inmate Flame of Hope Run Raises Thousands of Dollars for Special Olympics

By Ike Dodson

Inmates in the California prison system used wooden or crocheted torches to participate in a torch run and support Special Olympics.

Special Olympics Northern California made history this summer when it organized the first-ever Inmate Flame of Hope Run, which took place inside the California Correctional System.View Story Special Olympics Northern California made history this summer when it organized the first-ever Inmate Flame of Hope Run, which took place inside the California Correctional System. Nearly 200 inmates participated, crafting an array of crocheted and wooden flames and showering volunteers and athletes with support. The inmates donated their own money and their family members also participated by sponsoring their loved ones. Special Olympics Northern California athlete Karissa Krater, a 50-time Special Olympic gold medal winner, participated as well. “The reaction we got here was absolutely incredible,” said Camille Cooney, Special Olympics Northern California’s Associate Director of the Law Enforcement Torch Run. “It shows the general public there are contributions being made to these athletes from men and women within the correctional system and it also shows our athletes the kind of magic that enables them to do their sports.” More than $6000 was raised to benefit Special Olympics Northern California.

About Ike Dodson:I am the Public Information Officer, Office of Public and Employee Communications, with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
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