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Our Coaches

Floor hockey players in South Africa gather round their coach for a strategy session before a tournament held near Johannesburg. Photo by Will Schermerhorn

Was there a mentor, teacher or coach who made a difference in your life? The one who gave you the courage and determination to strive to be your best? The one who helped shape both your performance and your character? You can be that important person in someone else’s life.

Become a Coach

To become a coach, get in touch with Special Olympics near you.

More Than a Coach

Coaches teach the skills and spirit that define a true athlete. Coaches are role models and character-builders.

Special Olympics coaches go even further -- they help athletes with intellectual disabilities find their own strengths and abilities. They also show them how to build upon those strengths and improve every day.

As a Special Olympics coach, you bring enthusiasm, commitment and a positive attitude to each practice, event and competition. You will enrich the lives of our athletes in many life-changing ways. The skills and confidence an athlete learns through sports have a long and lasting effect. They can help an athlete succeed in school or even find a job.

Coaches also get a lot in return. They get to know athletes who inspire -- athletes who are brave and determined, despite the odds against them.  Coaches become more than teachers, mentors and role models -- they are seen as leaders in the community.  


About Intellectual Disability

Special Olympics is a global movement of people who want to improve the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. But what are intellectual disabilities? Learn More

Coaching Excellence

Special Olympics is committed to coaching excellence -- because it benefits both coaches and athletes at the same time. In a supportive learning environment, coaches work to enhance athletes’ sport techniques, tactics and fitness.

We partner with sports organizations to provide the highest and most up-to-date level of coaching knowledge. 

Coaching education helps our coaches recognize each athlete’s potential. It also comes into play as we increase training and competition. Those opportunities help each athlete can reach -- or exceed -- their personal best.

Special Olympics focuses on our athletes. 

Our coaches aim high and take pride in their athletes' achievements, which can often be life-changing moments. 


Stories About Our Coaches


September 23, 2016 | North America: Iowa

Living Unified: Tiffany & Robin

By Lori Emery

Robin Hair, left, and Tiffany Bauerly play on a Special Olympics Unified Sports bowling team.

Special Olympics athlete Robin Hair and Unified partner Tiffany Bauerly of Iowa have lived and played unified for more than 12 yearsView Story Special Olympics athlete Robin Hair and Unified partner Tiffany Bauerly of Iowa have lived and played unified for more than 12 years. They are proud to be part of Special Olympics Unified Sports®. Tiffany was in college when she met Robin. Tiffany and Robin go to know each other through going bowling every week in Sioux City, Iowa. That led to a great friendship. After more than a decade, they are bowling once again through Special Olympics Unified Sports. Tiffany said that being a Unified Partner has been great for her. Unified Partners get to play alongside athletes with intellectual disabilities. Many develop friendships that would most likely not be available in the world outside of Special Olympics. Read more about their friendship at the link below.

About Lori Emery:As the delegation manager for the Sioux City Knights Special Olympics Iowa team, I have seen the impact that Unified Sports has had on so many of our athletes and families. This story features two of our Unified bowlers. Their story is one of how living a unified lifestyle that was started years ago has brought them even closer together doing the sport they love through Special Olympics.
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August 30, 2016 | Asia Pacific: Indonesia

Everyone is unique and special

By Chyntia Poedjokerto

Everyone is created differently. With different characteristic, different physically and different ability.View Story Everyone is created differently. With different characteristic, different physically and different ability. No one should deserve to be called retarded when they are different. When we talk about different. What standard are we comparing with as everyone is different.

About Chyntia Poedjokerto:I am a parent coach of special needs children. Parents must focus on the child's ability instead of disability.
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August 12, 2016 | Europe Eurasia: Great Britain

R word

By Ange

I live in Great Britain and many years ago the word commonly used for Down syndrome was "spastic" retarded was used as well.View Story I live in Great Britain and many years ago the word commonly used for Down syndrome was "spastic" retarded was used as well. Finally in this modern world we refer to these types of conditions as special needs. I have a child with special needs he is autistic. In this country it is offensive to use words such as spastic or retarded although they are still heard but a lot less often.these offensive words and phrases are passed down from parent to child no child is born to hate or disrespect they are taught to hate and disrespect.

About Ange:
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July 27, 2016 | North America: Michigan

"What's the matter with him?"

By Alexia Weber

Some years ago my youngest daughter (age 4) was asked "what's the matter with him?" about her brother's best friend.View Story Some years ago my youngest daughter (age 4) was asked "what's the matter with him?" about her brother's best friend (age 6 before they were old enough to be Special Olympics athletes) by a pre-teen aged boy. The young man in question has CP and is in a wheelchair. He is non-verbal and non-ambulatory. My daughter has been around him since she was born. She looks him up and down, smiles and says in typical 4 year old fashion, "nothing." He wasn't crying or fussing so he was fine in her eyes. Older child tries to rephrase: "Why is he in the wheelchair?" Daughter doesn't miss a beat and responds with "because he isn't on the floor." Her innocence is what we all need to focus on. There was nothing wrong with her buddy, he was just fine to her. Just because someone may use a wheelchair doesn't mean anything is "wrong" Now I know what that boy was after - he was looking for something more specific he would at age 13 work with. Well don't ask a 4-year-old...

About Alexia Weber:I am part of area 27. I am a parent, coach, training clinician, volunteer, whatever this wonderful organization needs. SO has been the best thing for our family. Really helps my son shine and grow into the wonderful young man he now is (age 20).
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July 22, 2016 | North America: Michigan

"What's the matter with him?"

By Alexia Weber

Some years ago my youngest daughter (aged 4) was asked "what's the matter with him?" about her brother's best friendView Story Some years ago my youngest daughter (aged 4) was asked "what's the matter with him?" about her brother's best friend (aged 6, before they were old enough to be Special Olympics athletes) by a pre-teenage boy. The young man in question has CP and is in a wheelchair. He is non-verbal and non-ambulatory. My daughter has been around him since she was born. She looks him up and down, smiles and says in typical 4-year-old fashion, "nothing." He wasn't crying or fussing so he was fine in her eyes. Older child tries to rephrase: "Why is he in the wheelchair?" Daughter doesn't miss a beat and responds with "because he isn't on the floor." Her innocence is what we all need to focus on. There was nothing wrong with her buddy; he was just fine to her. Just because someone may use a wheelchair doesn't mean anything is "wrong." Now I know what that boy was after -- he was looking for something more specific he would at age 13 work with. Well, don't ask a 4 year old...

About Alexia Weber:I am a parent, coach, training clinician, volunteer, whatever this wonderful organization needs. Special Olympics has been the best thing for our family. Really helps my son shine and grow into the wonderful young man he now is (age 20).
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July 01, 2016 | Europe Eurasia: Malta

Athlete Leader Fiona Ellul Bonici a true inspiration in Malta

By Mo Clarke

Fiona with her mum, Christine

Fiona Ellul Bonici, 21, is not just a great goalkeeper for the Special Olympics Malta football team. She is much more.View Story Fiona Ellul Bonici, 21, is not just a great goalkeeper for the Special Olympics Malta football team. She is much more: a colleague, a Coach Assistant and a Young Athletes Coach. Fiona began working at Special Olympics Malta in 2014 as part of the Leap Project, a Government initiative which places people with disabilities in the workplace. She works in the program office but also takes part in regular training sessions. When she started assisting at the swimming sessions it was obvious where her talents lay. “It was evident immediately how good Fiona was with the athletes, she was so patient during trainings and she had a special connection with the younger children” says Sports Director Elaine Bonnici. This led to her becoming part of the Young Athletes team. “It gives me so much satisfaction to see the children improve as they take part in regular trainings. I also see them learning to take their turns and how to say ‘Please’ and ‘Thank You’, “said Fiona. She added: “I have developed so much myself since I began coaching Young Athletes. I used to be very nervous and had difficulties communicating with others. I am now so much calmer and find it much easier to speak with people. My mother has also noticed how I much have improved and developed socially.”

About Mo Clarke:Manager - Young Athletes, Families & Athlete Leadership for Special Olympics in Europe Eurasia
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June 24, 2016 | North America: Illinois

Bond Between Student and Coach Transforms Life of Special Olympics Swimmer at YMCA

By Carolyn Gessner

Sam Kasallis (left), with Coach Tom March of the North Suburban YMCA, poses with the medals he earned at the Special Olympics Illinois District Swim Meet on March 19. Sam went on to compete in the Illinois Summer Games, earning a silver medal in the 25M Freestyle.

Less than a year ago, Sam Kasallis could barely dog-paddle. Fast forward to today, and Sam is a strong swimmer who just won a silver medal.View Story Less than a year ago, Sam Kasallis could barely dog-paddle. At age 15, the Deerfield, Illinois resident with autism had tried regular swim lessons, but his special needs were too challenging for most instructors. Fast forward to today, and Sam is a strong swimmer who just won a silver medal in the 2016 Special Olympics Illinois Summer Games. Sam’s achievements grew out of a special coach-student relationship at the North Suburban YMCA. Instructor Tom March, an expert in helping individuals with autism, worked with Sam in private lessons. As Sam’s skills progressed, Coach March encouraged him to join the Y’s “Flying Turtles” Special Olympics team. Sam overcame all obstacles to earn gold and silver medals at the Special Olympics District Meet on March 19. At the June Illinois Summer games, the Flying Turtles brought home 10 gold medals and two silvers – including one earned by Sam in the 25M Freestyle.

About Carolyn Gessner:Carolyn Gessner of Creative Marketing Associates in Northfield, Illinois, represents the North Suburban YMCA. For over 45 years, the NSYMCA has served families in a 15-city region north of Chicago, Illinois. For more information, visit http://nsymca.org.
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